An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging.

X-rays are most commonly used to diagnose abnormalities of the skeletal systems (bones), chest and abdomen. X-rays require no special preparation.

The technologist, an individual specially trained to perform radiology examinations, positions the patient on the x-ray table and places the x-ray digital recording plate under the table in the area of the body being imaged. When necessary, sandbags, pillows or other positioning devices will be used to help you maintain the proper position. A lead apron may be placed over your pelvic area or breasts when feasible to protect from radiation.

You must hold very still and may be asked to keep from breathing for a few seconds while the x-ray picture is taken to reduce the possibility of a blurred image. The technologist will walk behind a wall or into the next room to activate the x-ray machine. You may be repositioned for additional views and the process is repeated.

Your examination will be interpreted by a Radiologist, who is a Physician (M.D.) specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations. He/she will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will discuss the results with you. Upon request, you can arrange a consultation with the Radiologist who interpreted your examination.